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Are micro managers sucking the life out of your people?

Alexandria Joy - Sunday, June 12, 2016

You know the kind.

The ones who invoke the sound of Dracula entering the shot in your head when they walk into the office. The Micro Manager. The energy zapper. The whingy, whiny, shouting, finger pointing painful manager. 

I call them Container Managers. 

Container Managers are basically the managers who find it hard to let go of the reins, to trust their team and get out of the way.

Container Managers are typically good at doing what has to be done. They are good at dealing with facts and not letting their emotions or other people’s emotions get in the way of making a decision.

Container Managers are great at developing procedures, implementing plans, and believe that no-one can do the job as good as they can.

Container Managers have a tendency to hold onto decision-making and undertake jobs that could be delegated which is not conducive to the creation of an effective culture and rather than creating a high performance team it is very probable that they are sucking the life out of your people.

Container managers are typically responsible for the bottleneck in organizations, where innovation is stymied and ideas are shelved. True they may be producing revenue and results in the short term however they rarely create a leadership pipeline, are reliant on the command and control approach and can ill-afford time off as their teams become co-dependent.

Container Managers approach may have worked in 1965 but it will not allow a company to survive in 2020.

The New Leadership Alternative

The best way for an organizations to begin to shape and construct a more positive and productive future culture is to start with its managers and leaders as well as with those in linchpin positions – in middle management.

In their book Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter, Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown discuss how great leaders extract at least two times more capability from their people than poor leaders.

Expander Leaders build great, sustainable, positive cultures.

Expander Leaders live by the motto that you have to give power to empower.

Expander Leaders value inclusiveness and participation, they hand over the decision-making process, and let their employees govern themselves.

Expander Leaders deal with the facts, but also consider how it impacts people emotionally. They listen to their employees, realize their strengths, tap into their potential, and include them in the growth of business.

Expander Leaders understand the power of emotions and non-verbal communication. They create healthy relationships, a caring and trusting environment which brings out best in their team.

Expander Leaders appreciate others, engage in purposeful conversations and help their people to find work they love to do.

Expander Leaders create driven, loyal employees who are engaged and energized, who want to make a valuable contribution to the organization and go the extra mile.

If you want to read more about creating a culture that works with more expanders than containers read my article here.

Which leaders are you creating in your company culture? #startwithU


The Best Leaders Embrace Imperfection

Alexandria Joy - Friday, January 16, 2015


I have a dream.

I imagine a world where everyone has an opportunity to love their work and do their best work using their unique strengths every day.

Sadly many modern workplaces with their rigid policies, procedures, measures, position descriptions and obsessive overwork cultures are doing little to encourage individuals to embrace their uniqueness and quirky ways.

In my experience the most important people in organisations are not the executives at the top but the team leaders and middle managers as they are the catalyst for every success or failure a company has. Everything from communication, innovation, and change to productivity and growth, flows through the team leader or line manager.

We all know the old saying that people join a company but leave their manager and through my work I speak to lots of leaders, supervisors and line managers and they all say they want to build a great team culture – but they don’t always know how or where to start.

One of the first steps in becoming a great Expander Leader is to stop beating your self and your people up for not being perfect.

Perfectionism is not healthy striving. When we aim for perfection we focus on the negative, on what’s not working and what we are lacking.

Perfectionism is crippling. It’s the vice of a Container Manager. It comes from a place of low self-worth, of controlling, insecurity and devilish detail.

Imperfection is freeing. It’s the joy of being an Expander Leader. It comes from a place of growth and expansion, of delighting in possibilities and being comfortable with emotions and being authentic.

Think of the bristle of a paintbrush left stranded in a painting. The uneven glaze of a Japanese ceramic cup. The delightful quirkiness of a homemade go-cart.

Perfection comes out of moulds or off assembly lines.

Things made by nature or by hand, like us are imperfect. It’s the little things that make us unique and unlike any one else that allow us love our work and give our best performance every day.

The same is true for leaders, companies and workplace cultures too. There is no one perfect way to build a great culture or team or business. There is no best structure, framework or performance management system.

What makes Expander Leaders great is that they:

  • Are not the strongest, they are the ones who are honest about their weaknesses
  • Are not the smartest; they are the ones who admit how much they don't know.
  • Are the ones who can't do it all; they are the ones who look to others to help them.
  • Are the ones who don't try to be perfect, they try to be themselves.

If you are a manager, supervisor or team leader what's one thing you can do to celebrate the UQ (Uniqueness Quotient) in your people? Remember to #StartwithU

Now it’s your turn. Tell me, where has perfection held you back from progressing from doing your best work?

I'd love to know. Share your thoughts in the comments below.


How Our Workplaces Are Making Us Sick

Alexandria Joy - Friday, December 26, 2014
It was during working on a campaign while I was Director at WorkCover that I had an epiphany that would stay with me into all my future work and businesses.

We ran a marketing campaign called “Homecomings” with the help of creative agency Shannon’s Way – it was all about the need for workers to come home safe from work every day to their family, friends and loved ones. The taglines for the campaign included:
“Your reason for workplace safety is not at work at all.”
“Work safe. Home safe.”


These taglines really struck a chord with our market research test audiences as well as our staff before we even launched the campaign. What really hit home for me how much we entrust the lives of our loved ones into the hands of their employers every day they go to work. The campaign footage showed a young boy waiting for his father to come home, two teenagers who barely acknowledge their dad but their dog getting excited to see him and other various 'coming home' scenes.

My powerful epiphany was how every worker in every workplace is someone’s son or daughter, someone’s mother or father, brother, sister, husband or wife, partner or best friend. Here in Western society we all believe that it’s our fundamental right to work in a safe and healthy workplace and that each day we should be able to go home from work as healthy – both physically and psychologically - as we did when we left in the morning.

Which means the leaders of every company and team are trusted to act like a pseudo parent in their employees extended work family. I believe it is imperative that leaders come from a place of love and genuine care about the wellbeing of the precious lives under their care and supervision, and not just because of some legislation. Those who take up this duty and choose to serve their workers as an extended family, not hired labour or resources to be used, will create stable innovative, high performing, loyal teams over the long term. Sadly few managers and leaders take it this seriously, or have really considered the entrusted role they hold.

What we need therefore, is to build more organisations that prioritise the physical, social, emotional and psychological wellbeing of their workers so we can build happy and healthy families and communities.

As leaders, it is our responsibility to become Expander Leaders, advancing our organisations to create more leaders who in turn grow, flourish and are more likely to serve and become Expander Leaders themselves.

Sadly, during the past few years of downturn and financial crisis and economic instability, a container management style has become more prevalent and it has brought cultures of fear, isolation, blame, threats and stress. As people contract, retract and retreat, they also resort to bullying, harassment, backstabbing and competition, rather than collaboration and cooperation.

Figures from WorkCover NSW between 2000 and 2014 show a marked increase in the number of bullying and harassment workers compensation cases. In 2012/13 the majority of occupational disease claims in NSW alone were mental health diseases accounting for 2235 claims. These mental diseases included such things as clinical depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Although “stress” itself is not a compensable condition, it is one of the many possible factors that may contribute to the contraction or aggravation o a compensable psychological condition. These mental health claims account for 34 per cent of al occupational disease claims and the total gross incurred cost was $49 million with an average cost of around $22,000 per claim. Plus the total time lost as a result of mental disease claims was 39,609 weeks with an average of 18 weeks per claim.

Anxiety/ stress disorder and anxiety/depression claims accounted for 59% of all claims. Industries where mental disease claims accounted for more than 50% of their occupational disease claims were education and training, public administration and safety, accommodation and food services, health care and social assistance – all industries that should be focused on care, love and service! Occupations which accounted for these claims included protective service workers, education professionals, carers and aides, human resources and marketing professionals, health professionals and health and welfare support workers.

This data is from just one state in Australia over the period of one year only! Our workplaces are indeed making us sick and our leaders must take their responsibility to create a positive, healthy culture seriously.

What are we doing wrong?

The raw truth is that an organisations’ success is based on leadership excellence not management acumen. Many organisations give lip service to the concept of their people being their most important resource. What is needed are more Expander Leaders who truly see their people for the unique individuals they are and truly care about those entrusted to their care.

When we become the architects of our company cultures rather than passive participants, we can create workplaces where people are grateful for the opportunity to volunteer their best work every day. To create this takes a series of small, incremental changes and conscious moves, not a single pill.

I believe that when we consciously, deliberately and intentionally choose to design our workplace cultures using the principles of Expander Leadership, love and recognising the UQ (unique strengths) in every individual we unleash human potential. I invite you to join the movement and #startwithU.

If you're ready to #startwithU and want more information on how to lead during a downturn, watch my videohttp://www.uqpower.com.au/_blog/uqtv/post/four-steps-to-leading-during-a-downturn/

How Giving Chocolate Can Boost Company Culture and Profits

Alexandria Joy - Friday, November 21, 2014

Decades of research, in multiple countries around the world, has shown time and again that investing in a positive, high-trust workplace culture yields distinct, tangible business benefits. Studies show that great workplaces enjoy significantly lower turnover and better financial performance than industry peers. 

In a nutshell – positive teams means a positive workplace and positive profits. Sounds simple. The trick is making it happen. 

So what do most positive company cultures have in common? Let's call it the UQ factor (UQ = Uniqueness Quotient – recognising the unique strengths in every individual).

Our work and research has shown that positive employees work harder and are more productive than their less than chipper peers. The fact is these people choose to give their best work every day because they feel appreciated, valued and able to contribute their talents. The companies that grow these cultures recognise and deliver on the promise to value their people as their most important asset. 

It starts with the company recognizing and embracing the unique value of every individual employee and giving them an opportunity to do their best work. This means all managers must get to know their employees – their strengths and talents and take a sincere interest in understanding how they learn, grow and work best. 

Here’s three things you can give to create a more productive, positive and powerful workforce:
  1. Give feedback – people crave feedback, yet much of corporate communication is lacking in this area. When employees don't feel heard as an individual, they don't feel respected or positive about the workplace. When this happens, they begin to look for of greener pastures. Upskill your managers in how to have coaching conversations so they can start listening to, developing and leveraging the talent in their teams. Set up a quarterly or monthly meeting where the whole team can talk through their ideas and suggestions, and be sure to wave the flag when you implement an employee-suggested concept. 

  2. Give back - Most people want to work for a company they can be proud of, and this means doing well by doing good in the world. (This is especially important for Millennial workers). Your company needs to grow its capabilities in the EQ Quadrant of the UQ Powerhouse to become more socially responsible and more in touch with your local community. Get out in the local community and find ways to help, offer volunteer days off or align your company with a charity who is doing great work. 

  3. Give chocolate – Need I say more? Is there anything chocolate can't do? Rewarding and recognising staff for a job well done or for living according to your values and culture needn’t be reserved for the annual company dinner. Nothing works better than immediate, positive reinforcement so why not keep some sweet chocolate treats in the workplace for just such rewards? Workers like to snack during the day, and a quick word of thanks (or hand written note) with a special pick-me-up attached is sure to hit the spot. It’s a quick and easy way to improve mood and productivity
A great company culture can keep people productive and help you retain your best employees. If your bottom line needs a boost and you need to turn some frowns upside down then consider making giving a priority for your company culture. Using some of these outside-of-the-box methods, you can give your team a smile and give your company a productivity boost. 

Need help? Our UQ Power Pulse Check will help you find out how healthy your workplace culture is. 

What do you think? How do you improve employee happiness and productivity? Share in the comments below!

6 WAYS TO BUILD TRUST AT WORK

Alexandria Joy - Wednesday, November 05, 2014
Trust - it's a term bandied around all the time when it comes to leadership and organisational culture and with good reason. Nothing builds a solid culture better than growing a cushion of trust and nothing harms an organization more than a lack of trust in those leading it.

For such a simple, small five letter word, trust can often be challenging to develop and maintain in any organisation. But it can be done! Trust must begin from the top to be developed throughout an organization. If top management is not trusted it gives the perception that it is everyone for themselves and opens up rationale for building a culture of mistrust.

In a recent episode of UQTV titled "The Leadership Relationship" I address the issue of trust and how critical it is in creating sustainable businesses.

Here are six steps to help you develop trust in your workplace:

1. TRUTH TELL

Leaders who are trusted tell the truth even when it is easier to lie or leave out facts. There is no such thing as ‘the’ truth. There is only ‘your’ truth so practice becoming a truth teller - the more you tell your truth up front, the less cleaning up you’ll need to do. 

If there is a values statement for the organisation that includes any words about honesty, trust or integrity event more so - you need to ensure you act, speak and live those values before expecting staff to.

2. DO GOOD

When a leader does the right thing for the benefit of the whole organisation rather than their own personal agenda they are held up as examples of integrity for others to follow. This strongly reinforces an expansive culture of trust.

When a leader does what is convenient or beneficial for them and not for all it sets up a mistrustful, counter productive culture where staff feel justified to look out for themselves rather than doing what is most beneficial for the whole company. 

3. BE CONSISTENT

A sure way to grow mistrust is when managers start saying one thing to the executive or board and giving a different message to their staff. This makes staff feel like they are being manipulated, treated like children and used to make their manager look good.

Build motivation and trust by allowing staff to feel to confident that you are sharing a consistent message regardless of the audience.

4. STOP WITHOLDING

Withholding is like taking a razor blade to a company culture and all the relationships within it. Withholding is a breeding ground for catastrophising as in the absence of accurate and timely information rumors spread. Often the rumors paint a worse picture of the situation than would exist if the truth were told. 

Withholding information gives staff the message that they are not to be trusted to know the truth and therefore sets up a culture of suspicion and mistrust that rumors will only feed and fuel. 

6. CELEBRATE UNIQUENESS

One of the most common complaints we hear in workplaces is favoritism and unfair treatment. Treating everyone fairly, consistently and giving credit to those who deserve can be a challenge as we all have our own biases and personality preferences.

One of the challenges of leadership is to see beyond personal preferences and clearly see the unique value or UQ (uniqueness quotient) that each person brings to the organization. Imagine the motivation, engagement and cushion of trust you could build in your organisation by recognising and celebrating the UQ in every individual employee.

Want to build trust at work? #StartwithU

Why You Need To Engage And Retain That “Un-Loyal” Generation

Alexandria Joy - Monday, February 03, 2014

The people who have fulfilled the world’s need for skilled workers over the past three decades are now moving into retirement. This shift in demographic has a huge impact on companies that want to remain relevant and strong in changing times

While the Baby Boomers are moving out, Generation Y has moved into the workforce pipeline. The Human Capital Institute estimates that by 2025, Generation Y will make up 75% of the workforce.

The key to creating a profitable, sustainable business is developing a strong leadership pipeline.

Unfortunately, many companies continue to use “old-school” management practices that were originally targeted at Baby Boomers. This means that these organisations are not equipped to attract, engage, and retain Generation Y employees.

During our time helping business to power up their people, we’ve seen reluctance to targeting this demographic. Gen Y has a reputation for their lack of corporate loyalty; they change their jobs as often as they change their hair style.

But, for companies that stop “blaming” and develop strategies to meet the needs of this group, Gen Y stops jumping from job to job because they feel engaged and satisfied in their position.

We are now right in the thick of a workforce demographic shift; it is now more important than ever to prepare your organisation to fulfil expected talent shortages as Baby Boomers step out of skilled roles.

How Do You Do This?

First, you need to be fully aware of the needs of Gen Y, how they operate, and what makes them tick. Second, you will need to implement marketing, recruitment, staff engagement, and corporate culture strategies to ensure you meet those needs.

Here Are Some Quick Tips:

Provide Transparency
The 15th Annual Global CEO Survey 2012 revealed that Gen Y prefers development and growth opportunities three times more than a cash bonus as a form of benefit. When you communicate the future direction of the company and develop a personalised plan of how a Gen Y employee can develop in line with that vision, they’re more likely to stick around because they can see a clear path forward for themselves.

Provide Flexible Working Conditions
Unlike Baby Boomers, Gen Y don’t chase the idea of work life balance because they actually have a healthier perception that two aren’t mutually exclusive. This generation has a reputation for slacking off at times, but this is in comparison to Baby Boomers who have a belief of “success=work your butt off 100% of the time”. Things like flexible hours, flexible working conditions, and flexible “procedures” will help Gen Y employees to maintain the perfect blend of work and life. Focus on the outcomes, results and achievements they make rather than the how and when. If they check their Facebook Page every hour, does it really matter, especially if they achieve all that’s expected?

Create A Culture Where They Can Question The Status Quo
As Gen Y have a burning desire for professional development, it’s important to create a culture where they are safe to challenge the status quo. This is will not only keep them engaged, it will also grow a corporate culture of innovation and creativity – giving your company a unique competitive edge!

Succession Planning

Finally, succession planning is a brilliant strategy to fulfil your workforce pipeline with skilled employees. Teaming your experienced Baby Boomers with upcoming Gen Y leaders has a three-way benefit. Your Baby Boomer feels valued because they are given an opportunity to share their knowledge and skills with others. Your Gen Y employee is engaged because she is being groomed for further development and is learning new skills. And your organisation continues to build a culture of learning, sharing, teaching, and growth.

Here at UQ Power, we believe creating the right culture is the number one strategy to building businesses with influential brands. If you want highly specialised support in powering up your people, UQ Power’s Culture Improvement Program will turn your employees into loyal company advocates.

How to master any skill

Alexandria Joy - Sunday, December 29, 2013

When you want to learn a new skill, how do you usually go about it? Learn first and then practice?  If that’s your method for becoming a genius you’re on the right track, but you’re only half way to becoming a Legendary Master.

Psychologist, Dr Anders Ericsson did a study revealing that those who practiced a skill for at least 10,000 hours were more successful than those who didn’t. No surprises there as “practice makes perfect” right? Well… to a point.

Emotional Intelligence expert and Psychologist, Daniel Goleman explains the problem with this single method:

 “Ten thousand hours of practice may or may not bring you to the top of your game, and the reason is this: if you are a so-so golfer and you have a so-so golf stroke and you practice that golf stroke in a so-so way, in 10,000 hours you are still going to have the same poor golf stroke,” Daniel Goleman

Here at UQ Power, we believe that success is driven by four keys: Vision, Body, Intelligence Quotient (IQ), and Emotional Quotient (Emotional Intelligence or EQ). (We call this the UQ Power House). And when it comes to powering up your IQ muscle, it takes more than repetition to build strength.

Focus is key to boosting your IQ

As we’ve become more digitally connected, we’ve also become more distracted. We suffer from multi-tasking and undertake it with a matter of pride. Even when we’re performing just a single action, our brain remains in multi-task mode; distracted by other thoughts, sensations, and mental to-do lists. 

Continual multi-tasking has led our brains to reconfigure its neurons (the “hardwiring that sends messages”) to cope with only that sort of thinking. So when it comes time to focus… well… we simply can’t.

To become a true master of any skill, you need to focus when you practise. No distractions, no mental checks of what you need to do afterwards – full, present focus.

“Learning how to improve any skill also requires top-down focus. Neuroplasticity, the strengthening of old brain circuits and building of new ones for a skill we are practicing, requires our paying attention. When practice occurs while we are focusing elsewhere, the brain does not rewire the relevant circuitry for that particular routine.

Daydreaming defeats practice; those of us who browse TV while working out will never reach the top ranks. Paying full attention seems to boost the mind’s processing speed, strengthen synaptic connections, and expand or create neural networks for what we are practicing,” Dr Goleman.

Feedback makes perfect

When your golf swing is consistently causing the ball to veer left, it’s time to get expert feedback. A skilled golfing coach can tell you that you’re stance is affecting your swing and that you need to practice standing with your shoulders in alignment to your feet.

While you may learn a new skill quickly and easily, it’s likely that you’ll plateau. To get past it and to continually improve, you need feedback to help you see where your opportunities are and how you can strengthen your game.

In business, a team that performs well consistently still needs feedback. Progression and continual improvement will only happen if the team has an objective view of opportunities and strengths from which they can leverage.

How is your game? Is it time for you to get some feedback and guidance?

Here’s a story of how UQ Power helped McCulloch Robertson lift their game, increasing their cash flow by half a million dollars within a month.

 

Office Christmas Party Ettiquette

Alexandria Joy - Sunday, December 15, 2013

From hitting on your boss' wife to humiliating party games and the indignity of forced merriment, office Christmas parties are a minefield when it comes to maintaining your personal brand.

Here's four office party mistakes we suggest you don't make:

1. Singing karaoke

Regardless if you have a voice like Celine Dion, never partake in singing karaoke if you are in a Western workplace. In the days of smart phones your rendition of "I'm too sexy" could end up on You Tube or Facebook well before Monday morning's Board meeting.

2. Drinking in excess

Obvious, duh, however the most common mistake made by up and comings. While many organisations offer a full bar at their party, many people take advantage and don't realise the number of drinks they've had. If you don't want to make any career limiting moves like chatting up the bosses partner or urinating in the hallway pot plant, limit yourself to 2-3 drinks all night.

3. Finger food faux pas

Picture this: sticky spicy chicken wing in one hand, wet drink hand in the other, your boss crosses the floor with the Chairman of the board in tow, to introduce you. No napkin in sight you have to choose...shove the sticky wing in your pocket, drop it into your cup or offer a kiss on the cheek to the Chairman. (Oh yeah and one other food tip - don't double dip).

4. Whining while dining

The office Christmas party is meant to be a time when everyone can celebrate the successes of the year. That means a cheerful mood. If you feel yourself or the conversation slipping into whingeing, whining or bitching territory about work, colleagues, clients or anything switch topics before the complaints gather momentum.

Stick to these basics and you should find the Christmas party provides a boost to your brand rather than seeing you slipping off the potential promotion list. And if you think we're being conservative check out this top 10 list of the most embarrassing moments. This may be enough to put you off partying for life!

Leave a comment below and tell us your most your or "your friends" most embarrassing office party misstep!

While we're on the subject of Christmas check out our UQ Power Christmas video here. Did you photobomb us in 2013?


Open Plan Office Hinders Productivity

Alexandria Joy - Monday, November 04, 2013

Open plan offices with cubicle partitions were created in the 1950s to encourage communication and boost teamwork. It’s a trend that is still in fashion, but a recent study has revealed that this type of environment attracts higher levels of staff dissatisfaction.

The Downside Of Open Plan Working Outweighs The Benefits

Working in an open plan office has its benefits, especially if you love to take regular breaks to share hilarious tales of your life from the weekend. But it’s this type of distraction that could affect staff productivity and satisfaction levels.

The study, conducted by the University of Sydney, involved analysis of 42,764 survey samples collected in 303 office buildings across the globe. Noise and lack of privacy and space were the top gripes.

Professor Richard de Dear, Head of Architectural Design Science at the University of Sydney and a co-author of the research paper, said worker satisfaction was important because it was linked to productivity.

“The productivity benefits of teams working together have been used to sell the open plan office for decades. Yet, if you do these evaluations and actually talk to occupants of open plan offices, very few people think that they are productive spaces. You need places to concentrate.”

A Better Way Of Working

New to the 21st century, savvy companies are bucking the antiquated open plan trend to create an Activity-Based Work Culture.

When the Commonwealth Bank moved its headquarters in 2011, it used the opportunity to change the way their employees worked day to day.

The Bank’s Chief Financial Officer, David Craig explained: “Activity-based working recognises there is a spectrum of work styles and demands and that each day, people will have different activities to complete requiring varying levels of concentration or collaboration.”

In an activity-based working environment, employees aren’t necessarily stuck to the same desk. It recognises that sometimes they’ll need quiet time to focus. Sometimes they’ll need access to technology and sometimes they’ll need to brainstorm or share tasks with others.

At places like the CommBank’s headquarters, there are quiet, enclosed spaces, open spaces for collaboration, and areas for formal and informal meetings. Employees choose where to set up for the day, the morning or afternoon according to what type of work they need to do.

“Activity-based working delivers the working environment and tools for staff to choose different work styles to suit their work activities. It is about empowering them and engaging,” Craig said.

You can read more about the Commonwealth Bank’s workplace environment here.

Your Environment Affects Your Psychology

Your physical environment has a huge impact on your brand, your culture, and how your business is perceived (by employees and customers alike). At an individual level, it affects how people carry out their work, how they feel, and how well they perform.

Take a look around your workplace now. Does it scream efficiency and precision? Does it encourage creativity and innovation? Does it feel fun, cosy, or friendly? Does it have dedicated spaces to cater for different activities?

Every day the UQ Power team visit organisations from a range of industries and we see a lot of desks. We can usually tell straight away what the appearance of a desk says about the desk owner and the company culture of the organisation. See for yourself here - http://www.uqpower.com.au/_blog/desk-a-day

Why Train, Develop, And Power Up Your People?

Alexandria Joy - Monday, August 26, 2013

For many companies, a knee-jerk reaction to the challenges of increasing costs and outside influences has been to shrink, cut, slow, and reduce. Businesses from a range of sectors are shrinking the size of their workforce, cutting services, slowing production, and reducing diversified investment activities.

While it’s important to make these moves to stay in the game, it’s now more important than ever to power up your people. Job cuts and redundancies also affect the remaining employees and overall company culture. Shrinking and tightening the organisation in these ways makes the remaining employees see their position as being “vulnerable”. They go into survival mode and become protective of their patch – creating competition amongst peers rather than collaboration.

Rather than going to ground, now is the time to invest in and grow your people. After all, it’s valued and engaged workers who contribute the most to their employers and its companies that stand out from the crowd and tap into their UQ Power that get the customers.

Training and development is one of the best ways to power up your people. Here’s why:

Invest in your staff and enjoy the benefits - The benefits of developing and training your employees to help them reach their full potential are boundless. Not only will you see participants improve their performance as a result of what they learn you can also make use of action learning projects to solve some longstanding company challenges that might otherwise never have been addressed.

Invest now and reap even more benefits later - We all know business isn’t just about the present – we are forever looking to the future to secure our longevity. By investing in your company culture and employees now, you will expand and improve the quality of your company’s bench strength and have a larger pool of qualified talent when developing the company’s succession plans.

Retain your top talent - Showing you care about the future of your employees by contributing to their development demonstrates to them just how valuable they are to the company. This could help you to retain some of your top talent that you might not otherwise have kept.

Bring performers into the spotlight - By giving your employees the chance to shine in a more forgiving environment, such as a training workshop, you may just start to see them in a different light and find new ways to put their talents to work.

Weed out under performers - You will be able to identify some employees who had seemed to be rising stars, but who fail to perform well in a learning program, which will help the company avoid potentially costly promotional errors.

Reconnect to the business - With the pace of business today it’s easy to lose sight of the big picture. By bringing your executive team on a learning and development journey you will help company executives feel more connected to many parts of the business through their participation in the training.

Power up fast

With less workers to share the load no doubt you’re wondering how you can fit in training programs to up-skill your employees. By using a Bite Sized Learning approach and focusing on your company’s key competencies, you will quickly help employees develop the business acumen and execution skills they will need when they assume new leadership roles.

Rather than spending a lifetime studying degrees and higher qualifications, short bite sized courses gives people the opportunity to update their skills in only a fraction of the time. Ranging from 1.5 – 3 hour workshops, our bite sized workshops are perfect if you’re looking to build upon existing talents or increase motivation.

Drop us a line at http://www.uqpower.com.au/contact-us to find out more about our Bite Sized Learning program.

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